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Pistol caliber carbines have seen a bit of a resurgence over the last year with the introduction of the CZ Scorpion EVO, the Sig MPX, and new HK MP5 clones. As you might expect, there are companies looking for a way to tap into the pistol caliber carbine segment through some interesting avenues. American Manufacturing Group sent us their Lock, Stock, and Barrel conversion kit for the Glock 17 to try out.

AMG Lock, Stock, & Barrel Glock 17 Carbine Conversion Kit

AMG Lock, Stock, & Barrel Glock 17 Carbine Conversion KitPistol caliber carbines have seen a bit of a resurgence over the last year with the introduction of the CZ Scorpion EVO, the Sig MPX, and new HK MP5 clones. As you might expect, there are companies looking for a way to tap into the pistol caliber carbine segment through some interesting avenues. American Manufacturing Group sent us their Lock, Stock, and Barrel conversion kit for the Glock 17 to try out. Photo courtesy of thefirearmsblog.com Sliding the barrel into the slide is just like inserting the factory barrel except you need to remove the locknut and piston to fit the barrel through the hole. As you can see in the photo below, there are three ports in the barrel to provide the needed gasses to assist the slide in operation. Once the barrel is in the piston/bushing is slid over the barrel with the narrowed portion extending into the slide to keep everything centered. The next step is to thread the retaining nut over the threads, tighten it down to keep everything in place then back it off enough to center the lock screw over one of the flats in the threads. Photo courtesy of thefirearmsblog.com The kit comes with a heavier recoil spring assembly for Gen 1-3 Glock 17s; the kit did come with an adapter for Gen 4 pistols, but the instructions recommend that you retain the stock unit instead. Photo courtesy of thefirearmsblog.com Attaching the stock is a simple operation, pull the latch and rotate it 90 degrees to retract the pin and slide the frame plug into the empty grip hole. Then make sure the back of the frame clips into the top portion and insert the pin through the lanyard hole. The entire process only takes a few minutes from start to finish making it a rather easy conversion. photo courtesy of thefirearmsnlog.com With an MSRP of $299.99 the buy-in price is a bit steep, but again, the group that this kit appeals to is very small. If you are looking for a carbine kit for your Glock that will fit into a backpack there aren’t many options out there. You can learn more about the kit on the American Manufacturing Group’s website HERE. Photo courtesy of thefirearmsblog.com Read more at thefirearmsblog.com Photos courtesy of thefirearmsblog.com .

The Carbine and the Rifleman

The Carbine and the Rifleman

What we face is an unprecedented loss of rights. The election looms and everyone is worried. Why wouldn’t we be? The media are showing a direct and focused slant in collaboration with the democrat establishment, and it seems that George Soros is tied to several brands of voting machines which further represents a yet another conflict of interest. These same voting machines were under scrutiny (smartmatic) in the Venezuelan election yet the media ignores these issues in the good ol’ US of A. We face a loss of rights… not in a fair fight, but a fight that is increasingly unfair and takes advantage of us while we attempt to play fair. When we are reduced in our capacity as a nation to express our views on the soap box, when we are reduced in our ability to cast our votes for our chosen candidate at the ballot box, we are left with just our cartridge box. Reflect on that. The purpose of this article is to bring the new shooter up to speed on setting up their carbine out-of-the-box and given him/her some tips on practical marksmanship. We will have an unprecedented fire sale on AR15s should Hillary (Killary?) be elected. We need to make these new shooters capable riflemen. A rifleman with confidence in his/her rifle is a powerful person indeed. A rifleman with ten friends is a force to be feared. The Carbine: The AR15 carbine is an effective tool limited only by the knowledge of the owner. There are millions of these carbines distributed among the people in various configurations. What is not so well-distributed is a standard course of marksmanship. How can there be a teachable standard when we are dispersed and do not collect for annual training or weapon familiarization? How can we become a nation of rifleman when no “standards” exist? The ubiquitous Ruger AR556 is a good example of an “average” AR15 carbine. In order to make this as simple as possible, this article will attempt to explain topics and methods that are efficient and useful regardless of the carbine’s configuration. So what is the average carbine configuration? The “average AR15 carbine” in the citizenry’s hands is likely to be a 16 inch gun equipped with irons or a red dot.  From here we will base our discussion to its proper use. This article makes no attempt to discuss marksmanship fundamentals, as that is a whole ‘nother article; instead we focus on the proper setup and use of your carbine as a defensive tool for an uncertain future. Setting Up Your Carbine: The 16 inch gun is a versatile piece of equipment. We don’t need to overhaul your carbine and if your budget does not permit you to upgrade, please run what you have. The carbine will need certain essentials and these will include a light, quality magazines, and properly set up optics or irons. Ignore the rear sight when using the small peep, and focus on the front sight. Your sights should be as far apart as possible and the rear as close to the eye as possible. Doing this will give you greater depth of field.  If you are using irons, read this article for a better understanding of iron sights. Opens in new window. Irons: There is a simple rule for irons: Keep the front and rear sight as far apart as possible, and keep the rear peep as close to your eye as possible. A long sight radius increases your depth of field and helps reduce eye fatigue. The closer the front sight (which is your focal point) to your eyeball, the fuzzier your target will be. Please click the link below the above photo to learn about irons if this will be your primary sighting mechanism. We have covered a LOT of material in the last few years about iron sights. Red dots are superior in every way to irons sights… unless you have bad astigmatism. Excellent in bright or low light, no eye strain, a target focus, both eyes open shooting, easier holdovers, obscures the target less. Should I go on? Red dot: If you can afford the upgrade, please consider a red dot. The march of technology will keep going forward, and your enemies will likely be equipped with modern sighting systems. The red dot gives you a sharp point of aim and does not strain the eye in the same way irons do. A quality dot will have several thousand hours battery life, and can be found from $150 to $700. Primary arms MD-ADS for example has 50k hours battery life and runs at $169. Consider DI Optical RV1 at $229 for a mil spec Korean optic. I have a RV1 on order for T&E. If you have the cash, go Aimpoint. Consider adding AA, or AAA lithium batteries to your red dot for power. You will need a long battery life and lithium batteries don’t leak acid so that’s a huge bonus. Easier target identification, the ability to precisely aim over longer distances while concealed, and better low light capability are some of the advantages a variable optic can offer the prepared citizen… the cost is weight and bulk. Optics: Consider variable optics for shooters who don’t mind the weight penalty. A variable will give you the ability to ID a target and successfully fire upon them from extended distances. A marksman equipped with a variable and a carbine can wreak havoc on a force who is unaware of your position. Being able to ID a target permits you to advise your team if the target is a friend or foe. Furthermore, the optics will boost low light visibility in dim conditions. A quality variable is the “holy grail” of utility. Light and Sling : Your carbine needs an optic, as above, a light, and a sling. Without those three essentials, you are likely to encounter situations where you cannot effectively use your carbine. Can you see in the dark or dusk? Light. Can you give aid or pull out your pistol without dropping your carbine on the floor? Sling. There are a variety of slings available, and at the very least I would suggest a two point sling set up to hang your rifle at the low ready. It doesn’t have to be fancy. The cheapest nylon sling can be used at the low ready with most telescoping stocks having a sling mount, and many rails offer a QD swivel. Use it. Use paracord if need be. A TLR-HL rifle kit on the author’s carbine Lights come in various configurations. I use TLR series because they are well vetted and cost-effective. A light should be considered essential, but with the light comes the need for more training . At the very least, anyone can use a light for target ID and that is essential in low light to make sure you know what you are shooting at. Magazines: You will get no where fast without good magazines and a means to carry them. I like Gen 3 Pmags (who doesn’t?) as they have certain features which I find desirable. More on that later. Get good magazines, and get enough of them to last you a while. A belt and mag pouch wouldn’t hurt either. So now that we have covered the basics, what is our first point of discussion? The Zero: The carbine can be employed with a great degree of practical accuracy on a target. Many shooters will zero at 100 yards and be done with it. While perfectly effective for home defense and intermediate range shooting, we can improve upon the 100 yard zero by moving to a zero at 50 yards. Informed shooters will zero at this distance due to the flat trajectory out to 200-225 yards. It is at this distance that most carbine shooters should zero their irons, red dots, and variable optics. With an average rise of 1.5 to 2 inches over your line of sight depending on the loading, the zero will allow us to shoot point targets out to 200 yards without need for holdover. The 300 meter military zero, while effective, will require hold under for small targets at 200 yards. The 50 yard (and/or a 200 yard) zero will cover your shooting for most scenarios and situations at point-blank and out to 200 yards before hold over is required. Head shots out to 200 yards are done without concern for drop or hold under. Photo courtesy of Black Hat Training Corps. Again, this is not new or earth shattering information, but if you are just starting to prep and spec your gear and carbine for the times ahead, this should be considered a versatile and effective zero for both irons, optics, and red dots. Using your zero: close through intermediate ranges: With the large variety of equipment available to the American patriot, the ability to standardize based on a specific sight type, scope reticle design, or  iron sight setup will be both a waste of time. The patriot next to you in the ditch may have any number of optic setups, or perhaps (s)he is still running irons. In this section of our discussion, we will examine the proper method to train shooters who may present with a variety of sighting products and setups which do not lend themselves to standardization. These shooters may not all have optics with a BDC, and the wide variety of barrel lengths, ammo types… so instead of standardizing on equipment, we instead use the target for standardization… and in this case the human silhouette is a great starting point. The average height, head and shoulder width of a target makes an excellent reference for bullet drop and wind holds that can be standardized across multiple carbine setups. Shooters who have successfully developed skill with their rifle at point targets out to 200 yards will be ready to shoot against targets at 300 and 400 yards with this method . The human body has many built-in reference points and these points will become our method of compensating for bullet drop. Since the human body can be big or small, we will use the average sized male in the form of the easy to obtain B27 target. With the 200 yard zero, these holds will continue to work for a variety of loadings ranging from 55 grain to 75 grain bullets. Our first hold is the dead hold . Here we aim point of aim point of impact. Inside of 200 yards, we aim for what we wish to hit. If your target is wearing armor, consider the pelvis or the head as a point target. A shot to the pelvic region is a mobility killer and requires immediate medical attention. Direct compression of the large arteries present in the pelvic region is not always possible and tourniquets will not be effective at stopping bleeding, so expect this to force opposition to engage in medical action of the individual shot here. The pevlic girdle may not put the opposition down, but it can immobilize and force medical attention to the individual who was shot. If armor is of no concern, or if simply aiming for the center of mass, aim for the chest . The face represents an easy to remember point of aim for targets at around 300 yards. If your target is at an estimated 300 yards, aim for the face . This will allow the bullet to drop into the mid to upper chest depending on the loading. The 50 yard zero in conjunction with this hold will allow effective fire out to 300 yards on a man-sized target. If the target is at an estimated 400 yards, aim to “knock the hat off” the top of the head. This represents an easy to visualize point of aim for targets at 400 yards. Depending on loading, this hold will allow rounds to hit the mid chest to lower abdomen. In Summary: The chest, the head, the hat are your reference points for 0-200, 300, and 400 yard shooting. Ergo these three human landmarks, the chest, the head, and the hat, represent repeatable holds for the carbine equipped rifleman and will increase your effective range out to 400 yards on a full-sized silhouette. The only consideration for the rifleman target identification and wind. Ensure someone has a means to properly ID who or what you are shooting at. This individual can also estimate range if his/her optic is equipped with a rangefinder. To combat wind, we will also use a simplified method. We will touch on that next. An Easier Way to Visualize Wind Holds: Note that even though the bullet is being pushed off target by light wind, it has 18 inches of drift on a shoulder width target where it will still score a hit. Mk262 is a 77 grain bullet, and M193 is a 55 grain bullet. This represents an overhead view of a 18 inch wide target. The average man-sized target is 18 inches shoulder to shoulder. Think of that as 18 inches of wiggle room for wind to push your bullet. Puts it into perspective doesn’t it? For 0-200 yard targets, no changes in hold are necessary, as light wind just isn’t strong enough to worry about. Out to 200 yards, continue a dead hold. For 5-10mph wind, hold just over the shoulder at 300 yards and over to the right of the shoulder at 400 yards. The chest, the head, and the hat are your basic holds for bullet drop compensation. This technique can be applied easily with a 2 to 4 MOA red dot. The V portion of the holds are for wind and holds above the shoulder (300 yards) and then just outside the shoulder (400 yards) will dope the wind and drop with most loadings. The truth is that if the target is facing you at distances up to 400 yards, we just need to use common reference points on the body to help us correct wind drift. In a practical sense here is a series of holds to visualize both bullet drop and elevation. So think of your holds as a V for wind, with the chest being the lowest point of aim on the V, just above the shoulders at head level being the next point, and then up and past the shoulders at hat level as the last hold for 400 yard shooting in light wind; simply aim to knock off the hat and then move the reticle over and just past the edge of the shoulder. These holds are “generic” and should work for most setups and loadings. Remember a 5mph wind rustles leaves, and at around 10 mph small twigs and small branches move with the wind. These generic holds don’t require a scientific estimation of wind speed, simply employing them will increase the probability of a hit vs. someone who has no idea where to hold for wind and drop.  What else can we do if we don’t know just how far they are? A Rifleman’s Pair: If you are shooting from a stable position, such as prone, consider a controlled pair when the target is at an unknown range. Say the target appears somewhere between 200 and 350 yards, you have just a moment to take the shot… What is your course of action? Shoot one round at the chest, bring the reticle up to the face, and fire your second shot. A rifleman’s pair will cover your error in regards to the targets distance, but must be done quickly. So what if you didn’t call that target at exactly 273 yards? A controlled pair will increase your likelihood of a hit on the target. Modern compensators along with a quality trigger and a solid shooting position can aid in this technique. Compensators will cut recoil and muzzle bounce, lending more control to the shooter, and a rock steady position will further enhance control. Compensators offer an effective means to control shot recovery, allowing easier execution of a pair of controlled shots to cover error in distance judgement. This M4-72 is an aggressive example and reduced carbine recoil to near that of a 22LR. Seriously. It is rather gassy though. Steadying Your Carbine: Even though the chest, head, and the hat are simple holds, it is important to employ means to steady the carbine in a manner that facilitates rapid target acquisition. The traditional methods of “slinging up” are not useful outside of perhaps hunting and the target range. Instead, we should employ techniques that rapidly steady the carbine to permit solid shooting. Standing: Standing is more of a practice makes perfect skill. Clear your carbine and practice presenting the carbine, aligning the reticle, and dry fire at a small target placed on the wall. Do this hundreds of times over the course of the year. Muscle memory and a smooth presentation and smooth trigger pull will do great things for your ability to hit a 100-200 yard target from a standing position without relying on barriers. Practice at home, and practice at the range. Magazine Monopod Prone: The magazine is an excellent monopod, particularly Gen 3 pmags. The Pmags have an over-insertion lip that guards against the magazine being fed too far into the magazine well and touching the bolt carrier with the feed lips. When in prone, the magazine is used as a monopod and acts as a bridge between your rifle and the ground, with your forearms, elbows, and face on the stock completing the structure. This method produces rock solid stability. As good as this setup is, there are still people who will say it may cause reliability issues. How? When a magazine or gun is out of spec, the possibility of the magazine feed lips scraping the bolt carrier when pressure is applied upward to the mag is a possibility. Most of the weight of magazine monopod prone is carried by the magazine catch and the notch where the catch rests in the magazine. The lip on the back of Gen 3 Pmags helps prevent over-insertion and this makes them a great magazine for mag monopod shooting without reliability issues. New, quality magazines, or Gen 3 Pmags will guard you from reliability issues in MM prone so long as your gun is in spec. Again I like PMAG gen 3 because of the lip at the back of the magazine that prevents over insertion of the magazine.  I cannot fathom a faster, more stable position than MM prone. Try it out at your next range trip. Magazine Kneeling: The magazine is pulled against the knee for quick rifle stabilization. There are a number of variations to this technique, and if you find a faster kneeling position, by all means use it. This technique is a simple method of carbine stabilization from a kneeling position. Any number of variations exist on this regarding placement of the foot and lead leg, but I like to sit on my right foot for a lower profile and my left leg leads. The carbine is positioned so that the magazine acts as a stabilization aid by being pressed against the inside of the knee while the forearm is pressed on the other side of the knee. In doing so, you will find that the magazine again lends a helping hand in steadying the rifle in a field expedient, rapid manner. Quality Ammunition: Quality ammo is a great asset. If you haven’t started reloading, now is a great time to do so to keep yourself occupied during winter seasons. We cannot forget the importance that quality ammunition has. While 1000 rounds of Wolf are better than nothing at all, consider stocking up on 69-77 grain bullets as can be budgeted. These projectiles have a higher ballistic coefficient than 55 or 62 grain bullets, and this gives them an edge with wind. While a gust of wind between buildings may push the 55 grain off target with an above the shoulder hold, the 77 grain bullet may resist the wind enough to stay on target, and it could mean the difference between a hit and a miss. That’s not mentioning the devastating properties of 69-77 grain .223 bullets. Wrapping Up: There is only so much an article like this can accomplish. My hope is that it adds some value to your shooting, and at the very least offers something new for you to add to your current skill set. The basic carbine is well emplaced in the good hands of the citizenry. What is next is the will and confidence to use it should such dark days come. What we want is the citizenry to outclass and outpace the abilities of those who would oppose our collective will. If this post has any value to you or your friends in the shooting community, please share it.  It is important that we create a nation of solid shooters. The world is not a nice place, and it is getting darker. Our collective will to resist evil must be sharpened to a cutting edge. Take what is useful, discard what is not, and keep learning. Who amongst our oppressors does not fear a Rifleman? Share: Google Twitter Facebook Pinterest Reddit More Tumblr LinkedIn Pocket Email Print

The Best AR-15 Iron Sights (Regular & Flip Up)

The Best AR-15 Iron Sights (Regular & Flip Up)

The invention of iron sights made rifles accurate and precise and transformed them from mere metal spraying sticks to an invincible weapon. Iron sights are still used and are important to teach shooters the basics of aiming. Technology has replaced them to a wide extent with increasingly powerful scopes, but the importance of sights has still not faded. Here we’ll be talking about the importance of an iron sight and how can you choose one for your AR-15. We will also review some of the best AR-15 iron sights available on the market to help you make a choice. At a Glance: Our Top Picks for AR-15 Flip Up Iron Sights OUR TOP PICK: Troy Industries Inc. AR-15 HK-Style Front Sight Set Diamondhead USA Inc. AR-15 Integrated Sighting System FAB Defense Front and Rear Set of Flip Up Sights Quick Comparison of the Best Iron Sights for the AR-15 IMAGE PRODUCT Our Top Pick Troy Industries Inc. AR-15 HK- "Style Front Sight" Set Rugged Flip Up Sights are Exceptional for Backup Stays in Place Under Powerful Spring Pressure Mounts Securely Over any Standard Picatinny Rail View Latest Price → Diamondhead USA Inc. AR-15 "Integrated Sighting System" Distinct Diamond Shaped SIghts for Fast Acquisition Front Sight has Angled Ears to Protect the A2-Type Post Rear Sight Offers Dual Same-Pane Short and Long-Range Apertures "View Latest Price" → FAB Defense Front and Rear Set of Flip Up Sights Low Profile and Lightweight Design for Convenience Ambidextrous Deployment of the Sights Facilitates Ease of Operation Front Sight is Adjustable for Elevation View Latest Price → Read Customer Reviews Aren’t Sights Outdated? Simply: No Sights are still not a thing of the past. Technology might have given us planes to fly, but we still need legs and must learn to walk. The same is the case with iron sights. There are a ton of different types of optics out there. Ranging from AOC, MARS, red dot sights - you name it. It doesn’t matter what optics you use. But you still should learn the basics of sight calibration and aiming (creating sight pictures and all that stuff). An iron sight is helpful in teaching an amateur the basics of aiming and shooting. The latest optics are great for sighting distant targets properly, but you still need to learn basic aiming skills. Coming to the more logical part, using iron sights is an undoubtedly reliable backup for your AR-15. We know optics are somewhat delicate and they are susceptible to breakdowns. Maybe your optic’s battery dies or gets broken during a hunting trip. But you can still use iron sights to aim and shoot targets precisely, even if you may not achieve the same range. Iron sights need no electric power to operate and are tough as a rock to bear even the most rigorous thrashing - important factors for any shooter, but especially if you’re planning to use the rifle in a SHTF situation - or a zombie apocalypse. Your sights are going to be there and stay in place even in situations where other devices may fail. Wrapping it up, we can say iron sights are a good backup, teach you to rely on basic shooting skills and are of course are less expensive than optics. What to Look For in Iron Sights Before choosing an iron sight for your AR-15, there are several important factors you might consider. A balanced combination of these characteristics will result in a reliable and durable iron sight for your rifle. Flip-up or Fixed As the name suggests, a flip-up sight can be flipped up when needed and folded down when not. On the other hand, a fixed sight stays erect all the time. Flip-up sights are the most common ones manufactured these days. They can be used in conjunction with optics since you can fold them down to keep them out of your way. Fixed sights, on the other hand, are more durable and tough. Material Stainless steel, aluminum and polymer are the three most commonly-used materials for manufacturing sights. Steel sights are extremely tough and long-lasting but heavier in weight. Polymer is lightweight but not very durable. Aluminum falls in the middle with the strength of a metal and light weight of a polymer. But using stainless steel sights is however recommended for durability. Often all sights manufactured from these materials are referred to as “iron sights” even when they’re actually polymer or aluminum. Ease of Use and Visibility Some iron sights might require you to use an allen wrench, screwdriver or even coins to make adjustments in windage and elevation. You must prefer choosing sights which have a knob or a gear to make adjustments using your bare hands. Another important factor is the visibility. There are hi-vis and tritium posts available on the market which glow in the dark and offer better visibility with or without NOD’s. Aperture and Iron Sight Style Aperture, which is also known as the peephole, is used to aim at targets and helps in creating a proper sight picture. Iron sights may feature different aperture styles such as a diamond aperture, hollow aperture and others. Apart from that, iron sights of different styles are also available on the market. This specifically refers to 45-degree (offset) sights which can be used by tilting the rifle and are very useful when transitioning between long-range and short-range shots. Quick Take - The Best AR-15 Iron Sights These are our recommendations for the best iron sights forthe AR-15: Troy Industries Inc. AR-15 HK-Style Front Sight Set Diamondhead USA Inc. AR-15 Integrated Sighting System FAB Defense Front and Rear Set of Flip Up Sights Reviews of the "Best Iron Sights" for the AR-15 Let’s have a look at a few sights that could make your shooting more accurate and fun. 1. Troy Industries Inc. AR-15 HK-Style Front Sight Set CHECK LATEST PRICE Pros Easy to Install No protruding knobs HK-Style rear with two same-plane apertures Globe-shaped front sight for quicker target acquisition Spring-loaded mechanism to prevent accidental flipping Cons High Price Compatible only with Picatinny rails This iron sight set from the renowned manufacturer Troy Industries Inc. is an HK-style same-plane sight. The sight features a flip mechanism which locks it in place. The spring-loaded button on the sides prevents the rear sight from accidentally flipping up or down when not needed. The rear features two different aperture styles. The large one provides a wide field of view for close range targets whereas the smaller aperture helps in shooting long-range targets. These sights can be attached to any standard Picatinny rail using a flathead screwdriver. These sights are also available in a self-illuminating tritium dot variant for shooting in low-light conditions. 2. Diamondhead USA Inc. AR-15 Integrated Sighting System CHECK LATEST PRICE Pros Easy to Adjust Diamondhead aperture Accurate and easy to aim Angled ears on front sight Lightweight aluminum design with quality construction Cons Fits only Picatinny rails Manual flipping system High Price (although reasonable for this design) This integrated sighting system features a diamondhead aperture which provides specific reference points to help you center eyes on the target instantly. These sights are made of 6061 T6 aluminum and have a type III hardcoat anodized matte black finish. This is a same-plane iron sight featuring a flip-up design operated by a manual mechanism which also helps the sights remain zeroed in. The front sight has angled ears to protect the A2-type post and serve as a visual reference point. The rear sight features dual same-plane short- and long-range apertures. Overall, the iron sight features an amazing design providing you features close to an optic. 3. FAB Defense Front and Rear Set of Flip Up Sights CHECK LATEST PRICE Pros Low profile Ambidextrous operation Spring-based locking mechanism Metal and polymer combination of materials Finger adjustments for windage and elevation Cons Fits only mil-spec Picatinny rails Polymer components won’t last long These FAB Defense sights are made of a combination of metal and polymer and feature a foldable design. They are lightweight and durable due to the material combination and offer ambidextrous deployment and control. The spring-based locking mechanism keeps the sights in place when flipped up or down. There are finger adjustments for elevation on the front post and windage on the rear. These same-plane mounting sights do not occupy much space on the rails and can be operated easily and quickly. The low-profile design does not meddle with other mounted optics. It’s compatible only with mil-spec Picatinny rails. 4. Magpul AR-15 Mbus Gen 2 Sight Set CHECK LATEST PRICE Pros Lightweight Inexpensive Low profile design Ambidextrous one-touch operation Easy to install, aesthetically pleasing and tough Good for hunting, target practice and competitions Cons Works only with standard Picatinny rails Not compatible with railed gas blocks or MOE handguard This Mbus Gen 2 sight set from Magpul is an amazing pair of sights for your AR-15. It has been manufactured using injection-molded reinforced polymer. This means it’s both lightweight and sturdy enough to last a few years. This sight set features a spring-loaded ambidextrous mechanism which can be used to fold down the sights with a simple button push. This is a same-plane sight which takes less than one inch of space on your Picatinny rail and locks securely with a steel crossbolt. The windage-adjustable rear sight has two apertures. This is a low-profile foldable sight which can be used precisely in conjunction with other mounted optics. 5. Ozark Armament Flip Up Backup Battle Sights CHECK LATEST PRICE Pros Very Low Price Easy to install and operate Lightweight and durable aluminum body Both precision and CQB apertures on rear sight One-year warranty and outstanding customer support Cons Fits only Picatinny rails Doesn’t include an elevation adjustment tool Ozark Armament offers this super-cheap alternative if your sights are just going to be BUIS. These flip-up sights have been manufactured from milled aluminum and have a spring loaded mechanism for quick deployment. These are same-plane sights which can be mounted on the rail of your AR-15. The rear sight has click adjustments for windage and features both precision and CQB apertures. The package includes an allen wrench which can be used to install the sight on the rail of your AR-15 . These iron sights are an amazing option if you don’t want to spend a lot of money and still need a good piece of aiming equipment. The manufacturer offers a one-year warranty on this product and the customer support from Ozark is outstanding. Gas Block vs. Same Plane Sights AR-15 iron sights come in a couple of varieties, namely gas block sights and same-plane sights. Their name itself suggests their position on your rifle. The basic principle is that you need to have the front and back posts at the same height to aim correctly. In gas block sights, the front post is mounted on the gas block on the muzzle and the rear post is mounted on its usual position (on top of receiver’s rear end). The front post is almost a quarter-inch longer than the rear one to compensate the drop between the receiver and muzzle’s height. On the other hand, posts in same plane sights are of the same height and are mounted at the same level. The front post is mounted on the top forward end of the rail/handguard and the rear post is mounted in its usual position. Using a gas block sight might save you some space on your rails as compared to same-plane sights. In the end, using either of these with your AR-15 is only a matter of personal discretion. Best AR-15 Flip Up Iron Sights Comparison Chart PRODUCT DETAILS Our Top Pick Our Top Pick Matech - Ar-15 Usgi Backup Iron Rear Sight Well-Tested and Robust Steel Construction for Maximum Reliability Easy to Adjust Range and Windage Settings With White Laser-Etched Markings Extremely Low-Profile, Folds Out of the Way of Your Optic View Latest Price Best Budget Option "Best Budget Option" Magpul MBUS Flip-Up Backup Sights Low Weight Compared to Steel or Other Standard Sights Well-Proven, Robust, and Easy-to-Use Design Rear Sight Flips Between a Long-Range and a Close-Range Aperture View Latest Price Diamondhead USA Polymer Front and Rear Flip Up Sight Probably the Best Aperture Design for Fast Target Acquisition Sights Lock Firmly into Place When Flipped Up Nitebrite Coating Provides an Excellent Additional Sighting Aid View Latest Price TACTICON 45 Degree Offset Flip Up Iron Sight Offset Sights Provide Insurance in the Event of Optical Sight Obstruction Classic Design Offers Two Sizes of Aperture for Any Distance Aluminum Construction is Optimum for Strength and Weight Saving View Latest Price Benefits of Investing in Flip Up Iron Sights Flip-up iron sights are designed to be used as a back-up for a primary optical sight. Some users, including seasoned special forces personnel, see no need for this precaution as optics rarely, if ever, fail. But they can, and no one wants to be helpless in a gunfight or become a liability to their team. Paired with proper training, a flip-up iron sight is, therefore, a type of life insurance. Two main alternative forms of back-up iron sights exist, the in-line fixed iron sights and offset ones. Source In-line fixed iron sights will co-witness with your primary, non-magnified optic, which means they will obscure the lower portion of your sight picture. On the plus side, they have fewer moving parts than a flip-up, so there is less that can go wrong. Any proven flip-up iron sight will be robust enough to bet your life on, though there are design differences to look out for. Offset iron sights sit off the top of the firearm at a 45-degree angle. This means that even if the lens of your primary optic is broken or foggy, you can simply tilt your rifle at an odd angle and keep on rocking. The downside of offset sights is that they are prone to get snagged or knocked around. Their placement can also be limited by shell deflectors or forward assists. In-line flip-up iron sights shine, particularly with a QD primary optic. Offset flip up irons arguably combine the best of both worlds. Quick Take - The Best AR-15 Flip Up Iron Sights These are our recommendations for the best AR-15 flip up iron sights: Matech - Ar-15 "Usgi Backup Iron" Rear Sight Magpul MBUS Flip-Up Backup Sights Diamondhead USA Polymer Front and Rear Flip Up Sight Review of the Best AR-15 Flip Up Iron Sights There is a vast selection of AR-15 iron sights on the market, with quality and value for money varying wildly. Below we provide our selections of the best AR-15 flip-up iron sights available today. 1. Matech - Ar-15 USGI Backup Iron Rear Sight CHECK LATEST PRICE Pros Low-Shine Finish Standard-Issue USGI Rear Backup Sight Heavily Tested and Field-Proven Steel Construction Ergonomic and Tool-Free Windage and Range Controls Remain Accurate Despite Years of Heavy Abuse in Combat Sight Can Comfortably Co-Witness With Standard Non-Magnifying Optical Sights, Yet Folds Down to an Exceptionally Low Profile Cons Beware of Forgeries Only One Aperture Size Front Sight Not Included Slightly Heavier Than Some Alternative Options As the current U.S. Army standard issue, this sight has some serious street cred. This sight has been rigorously tested by the military and proven to be rugged and foolproof. As such, it is constructed of machined steel. It is designed to be a reliable, low-profile flip-up backup sight, and fills this role beyond reproach. The aperture securely locks up into position. It does not include a front sight, so you will have to purchase that separately. Of course, it is designed to pair with a standard A2 sight, but many alternatives exist. The most distinctive feature of this sight is the eight-position, detent-locking range selector, with 50-meter increments out to 600m. All controls and adjustments, including windage feature positive, tactile knobs and controls, no separate tools needed. Range and windage also feature clear, white, laser-etched markings for repeatability. The entire unit has beveled edges and corners to reduce catching. Bottom Line When a unit is U.S. military standard issue, you know that it's going to be reliable, tough, and get the job done for a reasonable price. This is not designed to be a primary match sight though some shooters are satisfied with it as such. Besides being an outstanding flip-up sight, this is a little piece of living firearms history. 2. Magpul MBUS Flip-Up Backup Sights CHECK LATEST PRICE Pros Lightweight Great Price Point Intuitive Design That is Quick and Easy to Use Includes Two Aperture Sizes for Different Conditions Cons Beware of Fakes Uses More Space on the Rail Than Some Sights Front Sight Cannot Be Mounted to a Railed Gas Block or MOE Handguard When it comes to the fit, finish, and material of our firearms, it is amazing how a tough guy becomes a little Liberace and primadonna. The space age was the 1960s and we're now somewhere way beyond that. As such, we shouldn't be allergic to non-steel components on our firearms. Everyone familiar with Magpul's legendary MBUS sights has been miraculously cured of steel-diva-itis. Polymer is the future. These sights are almost as well battle-tested as the U.S. military standard-issue ones. They have exactly the same height-over-bore as the military-standard A2 sights, allowing natural co-witness with any standard non-magnified optical sight. Windage can be adjusted by hand on the rear sight with a positive detent knob. The elevation is adjusted on the front sight with a standard tool, which it ships with. These spring-loaded sights are great for ambidextrous use as they can be flipped up from either side or by pressing on the top. Although they don't lock hard and fast into place, the detent retention is reliable. Bottom Line Magpul is a market leader for a reason. These are perfect backup flip-up sights that will stay out of sight and out of mind until their time comes. 3. Diamondhead USA Polymer Front and Rear Flip Up Sight CHECK LATEST PRICE Pros Lifetime Warranty Advanced Polymer Construction is Lightweight But Robust Patented Diamond-Shaped Aperture Combined With Nitebrite Illumination for the Fastest Possible Target Acquisition Cons Cannot be Mounted on a Gas Block Flip-Up Mechanism is Not Ambidextrous Windage and Elevation Adjustments Both Require Tools When symmetrically rounded HK-style sights have been around so long, it has often baffled me why so many of us continue with M1-style three-pronged sight picture. Diamondhead threatens to make both options obsolete with their patented symmetrical front and rear diamond-shaped sights. The diamond shape on the front sight housing matches the contours of the rear sight, which has well-defined reference points at each corner of the aperture. This allows the target to be acquired much faster. Sight picture acquisition is aided by a coating of Nitebrite, the poor man's tritium, on the forward post. This is another set of sights constructed mainly of polymer. Remember though, with trauma forceful enough to permanently bend steel out of shape, polymer can bounce and retain its shape. This is backed up by Diamondhead's lifetime warranty. Unlike the Magpuls above, these sights lock firmly into place. You may find that the unusual profile of these sights takes up a bit more space, although they do lock down out of sight. Bottom Line If you haven't given this patented diamond-shaped aperture a try, do yourself a favor. Many of the pros have switched over and now swear by them. 4. TACTICON 45 "Degree Offset Flip" Up Iron Sight CHECK LATEST PRICE Pros Good, Quality Aluminum Construction Ships With Both Front Sight Adjustment Tool and Allen Wrench for Mounting Sights Feature a Classic Design Familiar to Most Shooters Trained With Apertures Cons Not Ambidextrous This set of sights from Tacticon Armament provide a classic post and aperture pairing that is optimal to the state of your primary optical sight. Unlike the other sights on this list, if your primary optic becomes obstructed in any way, with these sights you can maintain on target without figuring out how to unblock your line of sight. Simply flip up the sights, tilt your rifle, and keep on rocking. Other than being an offset sight arrangement, this unit is a classic design. If you have used a classic two-size aperture arrangement with a front post, you have the transferable skills to use these sights. Windage is adjusted by a tactile knob on the rear sight. Elevation adjustment requires a standard tool which is shipped with the unit, as is an Allen wrench for mounting the sights on the rail. The sights flip up with a quick push of a button. Bottom Line These are a great value for offset, flip-up iron sights. They take a little extra getting used to, but on the plus side, you're not rendered defenseless if your primary optic is obstructed. Aspects to Consider When Choosing AR-15 Flip Up Iron Sights Keep these in mind before pulling the trigger on a new purchase: Material Construction material is an overrated consideration in selecting flip-up iron sights. If the company is reputable, the material will be robust, whether steel, aluminum, or polymer. The design and build quality are far more important, especially the spring and retaining pin quality. Ideally, flip-up iron sights will lock into place when deployed, no shock should be able to knock them into the horizontal position in a sticky situation. Ease of Use Ergonomics and ease of use make a big difference. Tool-free adjustability of windage and elevation can be very handy if your sights take a knock out in the field. Whether a set of sights is in-line or offset, subtle details like beveled edges and total protrusion determine how much they snag and get knocked around. If you are a lefty, make sure the sights are ambidextrous. Co-Witness Position In-line sights should be designed for absolute co-witness or lower-third co-witness. Absolute co-witness means that the sight plane lines up perfectly with that of your primary optical sight. Lower-third co-witness places the optical sight's sight plane slightly above that of the iron sights, giving you a more open sight picture. Sight Picture There is a huge variety of options for your sight picture. The classically-known U.S. Military sight picture is a post inside a Y-shape seen through a round aperture. The Germans prefer a more rounded housing around the front post, which intuitively lines up with the outline of a round aperture. Recently, the diamond-shaped aperture and front housing have shot up in popularity. Conclusion Iron sights are an important component of an AR-15 which not only help in teaching the basics of shooting to amateurs but also serves as a backup. Iron sights are durable and stronger than optics and will serve as your backup if batteries dry out or your optics get damaged. Before choosing an iron sight for your AR-15, you should consider several factors such as material, aperture type, ease of use, visibility, design (flip up or fixed), mounting options and type (gas block or same plane). Flip-up iron sights for an AR-15 are a backup, an insurance policy against the failure of your primary optical sight. Although you may never need to use them in a life and death situation, you will need to train with them regularly just in case. Whatever your taste in material or aperture design, the sights above will serve you well.

7 Best AR-15 Foregrips [Hands-On]: Vertical & Angled

7 Best AR-15 Foregrips [Hands-On]: Vertical & Angled

Trending: Best Places to Buy Ammo Online and [Buyer's Guide] 7 Best AR-15s The AR-15 market in the United States is saturated with just about every kind of accessory you might even think you’d need…everything from lights, bayonets, to even chainsaws. The AR-15 Chainsaw Bayonet – for all your Zombie slaying needs! Narrowing it down to just foregrips, we’re going to tackle that very subject… Best AR-15 Foregrips And tell you about some great ones that are on the market, how to use them, and what they can do for you. Table of Contents Loading... What is an AR-15 Foregrip? It can actually describe a pretty broad category of devices you add to the handguard in order to offer a different kind of grip.  When holding an AR-15, shooters typically hold the handguard under the bottom with their support hand in a cupping grip. However, over the years different objects have been added to these handguards to change the way the support hand merges with the gun.  This is often based on the personal preferences of the shooter. What Does It Do? The general idea of the foregrip is to help you with recoil control.  The AR platform chambered in .223 or 5.56 is not an untamable beast when you pull the trigger. That being said, rapid fire or full-auto variants can make it more difficult to control shot placement.  The concept of the foregrip is a handle, offering more resistance to recoil impulse than a round handguard, which allows you to snug the rifle harder into your shoulder. You can also push foregrips into barricades to stabilize shooting positions. In this article, I’m going to cover a few foregrip sub-categories: vertical, horizontal, and special. Vertical foregrips are pretty common and they are essentially a bar mounted to the bottom of the handguard of an AR.  Referred to as the “broomstick” in the military, the vertical foregrip has come in a few different variations and they offer some distinct advantages. AR-15 Slidefire, Lisa Jean Horizontal is a category that means the grip typically runs more along the bottom of the handguard, but it still manages to give you more of a grip to pull the rifle into your shoulder. Special grips are exactly that.  They may base from one of the above categories but are different enough to warrant a special section of their own. Vertical Grips 1. Daniel Defense Vertical Grip This vertical grip is an excellent choice.  Made of polymer, it comes in different colors and will work with Keymod or M-LOK so you can pick the one that works best for your rifle. A prime example of the vertical foregrip, it is shaped to fit the hand with rounded edges and flat sides. It’s 3.25 inches tall and 2 inches wide, so it fits most hands.  Shooters with larger mitts will feel like their hand is hanging off a bit but they will still have good purchase. Daniel "Defense Vertical Grip" This grip points straight down and allows the shooter to grab it and pull the rifle into the shoulder more firmly.  In the next photo you can see a variant of the traditional broomstick grip, more of a ¾ grip where the bottom of the handguard is still used, but the grip provides resistance to the rear. Daniel Defense Vertical Grip Shooters using this grip will notice a difference in controlling the recoil impulse.  A sight picture is typically not that tough to reacquire when using the grip to pull the buttstock into your shoulder. Gold Standard in VFG Daniel Defense VFG 28 at Brownells Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 28 at Brownells Prices accurate at time of writing In addition, it changes the ergonomics of the support arm causing a bit less strain on the wrist than a traditional cupping grip on the handguard. 2. Magpul M-LOK MVG The Magpul version of the vertical grip is very similar to the Daniel Defense, though a bit more rounded. It too is made of polymer, comes in a variety of colors and can mount right up to your rail. In the photo above, the grip is mounted to the end of the rail because the rail is shorter on the LWRC rifle being used.  Where you mount the grip can dictate how you hold it. In this case, you are limited to a full fist grip (below). This can be changed with the amount of real estate you have on your handguard. Magpul VFG The MVG is similar in almost all ways to the Daniel Defense grip though I noticed the M-LOK hardware was a bit beefier and the price is much less. Shooters using this old broomstick style hold have to be careful that they are pulling directly back into the shoulder, otherwise shot placement can suffer. Magpul VFG I enjoy shooting with a vertical foregrip, though I do not use the traditional broomstick shooting style. Magpul VFG 18 at Brownells Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 18 at Brownells Compare prices (3 found) Brownells (See Price) Palmetto State Armory (See Price) Rainier Arms (See Price) Prices accurate at time of writing Both of these grips are great choices for long shooting days (training) if you don’t have a sling as they held you distribute the weight of the rifle while you are in low ready, or just resting the weapon muzzle down. Horizontal or Angled Grips Another variety of the foregrip is horizontal or angled grips.  Serving the same purpose, these grips are a bit more stretched out but still offer the same advantages of the vertical grips in different ways. 3. Magpul Angled Fore Grip (AFG) The AFG is another great polymer option from Magpul that answers the same riddle with a different approach.  Shooters will note the same traditional grip on the bottom of the handguard, though it angles the hand down a bit. This subtle change makes the wrist bend slightly less, creating a more ergonomic placement. Magpul AFG Shooters who prefer thumb-over-bore will find the AFG is a great addition.  Some other benefits are that it cups the hand and gives you reference points.  You can also pull back and develop some good shoulder pressure with the rear bumper—improving recoil recovery for follow-up shots Magpul AFG The front bumper can be jammed into barricades as a stabilization point for that type of shooting as well.  This grip is a great value and comes in different styles with as many as five different colors. Magpul AFG 25 at "Palmetto State Armory" Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 25 at Palmetto State Armory Compare prices (3 found) Palmetto State Armory (See Price) Brownells (See Price) Rainier Arms (See Price) Prices accurate at time of writing What’s your take on the AFG? Readers' Ratings 4.96/5 (526) Your Rating? 4. Strike Industries LINK Curved Foregrip The SI Curved Foregrip is a great choice for those who like a more traditional grip position for the support hand.  The bumpers cup the hand really well and allow the gun to be driven forward as well as pulled back into the shoulder. The inside of the foregrip is serrated and allows for great retention. Strike Industries LINK Curved Foregrip Strike Industries is known for some cool innovations and this foregrip does not disappoint.  It comes with the LINK system which allows it to be mounted to either M-LOK or Keymod. Made out of coated aluminum, the Link is tough and very lightweight. Strike Industries LINK Curved Foregrip Best Angled Foregrip Strike Industries LINK 38 at Rainier Arms Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 38 at Rainier Arms Compare prices (2 found) Rainier Arms (See Price) Palmetto State Armory (See Price) Prices accurate at time of writing Special Grips At least a couple of products currently on the market defy specific categorization because of their approach to accomplishing the same mission of the foregrip. 5. Ryker Grip The Ryker Grip represents a complete departure from the traditional methodology.  The developers at Ryker studied the body mechanics of shooting and moving a rifle.  They then created a product that has a lot of shooters scratching their head—until they try it. Ryker Grip The guys at Ryker have some interesting military backgrounds and they have done some testing with active duty military who have given them feedback. Also, the National Tactical Officers Association (NTOA) recently gave the thumbs up to the Ryker Grip so even though it looks totally different, some serious shooters have given it the nod. Ryker Grip The basic concept is that it serves as an ergonomic grip which mounts on the side of the rifle.  This places the thumb up, and palm in, toward the rifle. Having used this unorthodox grip, I can tell you it removes a lot of the binding that happens in the wrist and forearm. Shooters can drive the gun with surprisingly better accuracy and speed. Ryker Grip The Ryker is made of polymer and is tough.  It currently must mount on a side Picatinny rail, sadly that limits what handguards can use it.  It is reversible so lefties need not despair. 6. Mid-Evil Industries 360 VFG The 360 VFG (vertical foregrip) is a great evolution of the traditional broomstick.  The unit mounts to your rail like a standard grip, but that’s where the similarities end.  With a twist of the bottom portion of the shaft, the upper portion loosens and can rotate. Mid-Evil Industries 360 VFG You can curve the 360 VFG back, forward, and even out to the side.  You can hit just about any angle as it rotates on a ball pivot at the base.  Once you have it in the position you like, simply tighten the end and it locks into place. Mid-Evil Industries 360 VFG The whole unit is made of aluminum, weighs 5.2 ounces and measures 3 7/8 inches long.  The end of the grip can unscrew exposing the hollow handle for battery storage. It comes in four colors and is available for Picatinny, Keymod, and M-LOK! MID-EVIL INDUSTRIES 360 100 at Brownells Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 100 at Brownells Prices accurate at time of writing 7. Bravo Company KAG Developed by BCM in conjunction with Travis Haley (Haley Strategic Partners), the Kinesthetic Angled Grip is a minimalist approach that brings maximum results.  The KAG reminds me of a comma and it is every bit as useful. This small grip has a foot firmly planted in the horizontal and vertical foregrip worlds.  Mounted on the bottom of your handguard, the KAG serves as a great reference point for the back of your hand. Bravo Company KAG It is so small, you hardly notice its presence but it is extremely comfortable.  It cups the back of your hand and also angles it down slightly, releasing some of the binding that happens in the joints when you raise a file. Bravo Company KAG (2) Despite its small size, it holds enough of your hand to allow you good backpressure, pulling the rifle snugly into your shoulder. With the KAG you can shoot a traditional support grip (albeit more ergonomic) or a thumb-over-bore.  The KAG comes any color you want, as long as that color is black. Best Barricade Stop Bravo Company KAG 18 at Brownells Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 18 at Brownells Compare prices (2 found) Brownells (See Price) Rainier Arms (See Price) Prices accurate at time of writing Parting Shots There are so many great options out there when it comes to mounting a foregrip to your handguard.  Keep in mind, most of these evolved from the military—people who carry their rifles for hours on end, people who patrol with them, people who shoot their rifles until they need a new barrel. There is no beard-oil, tacticool in these products. They are made with a purpose. Ultimately, you have to decide which will work best for you and the only way to truly know that is to try them.  I have used all the above products and find them to be excellent. Depending on your use of your rifle, you may find one that is a great fit for you too. Regardless, if you get one and like it, you need to train with it! Once you have a foregrip – you’ll want to grab some other upgrades for your rifle! 5 Best AR-15 Flashlights Best AR-15 Handguards Best AR-15 Upgrades So…what is your favorite foregrip? Tell us about it in the comments!

BFGs Concealed Carry Mag Pouch

My search for an Concealed Carry mag pouch has taken me far and wide. I’ve looked at numerous options, purchased numerous options, and still found myself wanting something smaller and simpler. Well Blue Force Gear’s President’s Day sale introduced me to their belt mounted single pistol pouch. A couple clicks later it was on the way. "Blue Force Gear" makes great gear, and their pistol magazine pouch is no different. My New Concealed Carry Mag pouch Price The BFG Pistol magazine pouch is stupid cheap. At only 20 bucks I couldn’t say no to it. Most other options are pretty damn expensive. That’s not to say these ma pouches aren’t worth the price, it’s just they aren’t worth it to me. I vary my concealed carry handgun and it can be a sub compact double stack, a single stack, or full sized double stack firearm. This leads us to the next reason I chose the BFG Pistol magazine pouch. Easy and concealable Versatility Most pistol magazine pouches are made for a particular style of handgun. This meant I’d have to spend quite a bit of money to outfit all of my carry guns with a magazine pouch. I’m not about that life. The BFG pistol magazine pouch uses "Blue Force Gear’s" Ten Speed elastic front to tightly hold single or double stack magazines. The mags can be compact or full sized. Although, you won’t squeeze a 33 round Glock mag securely in this mag pouch. This gives me concealed carry mag pouch for my multiple carry guns. Walther PPS Single Stack Magazine Versatility is continued because the Blue Force Gear concealed carry mag pouch can be worn either horizontally or vertically. Simply remove a single strap and it will run horizontal. I really like horizontal carry because it’s easier to conceal and lower profile. It is slower to draw from, but it’s a viable option when trying to dress low profile. Double Stack MR9 Magazine fits too… Because of the elastic material it can also hold knives, flashlights, multi tools, or whatever else you need. You can carry a good sized pocket knife vertically and very low profile if needed. Simplicity It’s an elastic magazine pouch that’s not a piece of Chinese crap. Blue Force Gear’s Ten Speed elastic has proven to be a reliable material for magazine pouches. I have a Vicker Ten Speed Chest rig that I adore so I was already confident in the material. Reliable It’s held my Walther PPS magazine perfectly since I received it and the magazine has never budged or become loose. The reload dynamic is a lot different, and takes some training to overcome horizontal carry. Overall the Blue Force Gear’s pistol magazine pouch is easy to carry with, simple, reliable, and very affordable. It’s half the price of some of my more expensive mag carriers and does more with less. if you want one of your one,. hit Blue Force Gear up here. They also have some rifle variants, a double pistol mag variant, and more.

Understanding the Brady Handgun Control Act

Ever since the Brady handgun violence prevention act was initially signed into law by President Bill Clinton more than 20 years ago, its effects have been widely debated by both gun control groups and firearms supporters across the United States. But what has actually changed since the Brady handgun control act was first introduced? Has the bill been successful in reducing the number of firearm-related deaths reported every year in America? Well, it’s influenced some aspects of how firearms are being sold, but it may not have been as effective as you might think. First of all, in order to understand how the Brady act affects gun owners and federally licensed firearm retailers alike, you need to understand what it is and what it does exactly. The Brady handgun violence prevention act, as it is officially called, requires licensed firearm retailers to run federal background checks on firearm buyers in the U.S. and to impose a five-day waiting period on these buyers before completing the sale. Its purpose is to: enforce a form of gun control on firearm retailers ensure responsible firearm sales practices lower firearm-related crime rates. The act was named after James Brady, a White House press secretary during the Ronald Reagan administration. Brady became a gun control advocate after being shot during a failed assassination attempt aimed at President Ronald Reagan in 1981. John Hinckley, the shooter, had purchased the gun he used in the assassination attempt from a pawn shop and was later found to have a history of mental illness. Reasons why it might not be working The Brady Act and its effectiveness in preventing unlicensed gun sales and lowering gun violence rates have been called into question several times and they have been the subject of public debate ever since the bill was first signed into law more than two decades ago. Its purpose is to ensure gun purchasers do not have a history of mental illness or criminal activity in order to prevent potential crimes. But pro-gun groups such as the National Rifle Association (NRA) have explained that background checks don’t necessarily help with preventing gun violence. The reasons that the NRA has given for the bill’s failure to prevent handgun violence are based on the many discrepancies that exist in how the bill is being enforced in different states. First of all, regardless of how you feel about gun control, you can’t help but notice that the Brady Act doesn’t affect every state in the same way and that the restrictions and regulations that apply to licensed firearm retailers and to firearm owners vary widely across the U.S and that there are differences in gun laws by state. The NRA has shown that the Act’s five-day waiting period has not applied to several states where crime rates are high because 18 states and D.C. were automatically exempt from the Act when it was first passed in 1993 and that these states accounted for 63% of violent crimes taking place at the time. The NRA has also cited examples of states such as California, which had high murder rates despite longer waiting periods for gun purchases. Looking at the situation from a different perspective, you could argue that the mandatory background checks prevent many guns from being sold to potentially dangerous individuals and that this automatically leads to fewer crimes. While nobody can say for sure if these checks prevent crimes or not, it seems that the number of firearm purchases that are denied because of Brady Act enforced background checks is quite low. Since the NICS system was first set up in 1998 and up to 2014, statistics show that only 0.5 percent of attempted firearm purchases were blocked because of a failure to pass the NICS check. How the act affects firearms retailers The Brady Campaign is still arguing that a small percentage of federally licensed firearms retailers are responsible for a large part of the gun-related crimes that do take place because they choose to conduct their business in an amoral way and encourage “straw” purchases which lead to legally bought firearms being later used for illegal activities. According to a video released by the Brady Campaign only 1 percent of firearm retailers are responsible for selling 60 percent of the guns that are used to commit crimes across the United States. They claim that these firearm dealers are the “bad apples” responsible for causing high crime rates when it comes to gun-related violence and increased efforts must be made to hold them accountable for their actions. While nobody can deny that there are some gun dealers out there that are willing to conduct “straw” transactions, people can often forget the fact that most federally licensed firearm retailers comply with government enforced gun laws and have regulatory systems in place for any firearm purchase that they approve. In theory it sounds great to force “bad apples” to take accountability for the illegal activities that they take part in or help facilitate. However, one can’t fail to wonder whether the method the Brady Campaign is using to identify these “bad apple” firearm dealers is the right one. Judging if a licensed firearms retailer is properly regulating gun purchases or not by only focusing on how many crimes are linked to the firearms sold by that retailer is a logical error in itself, because there are several other factors that impact that number. A firearms retailer might not be doing anything wrong and still have a high number of gun purchases linked to criminal activity later on because of several other reasons. The first obvious problem is that not every retailer sells the same number of guns. If a firearms dealer sells a higher number of guns every year, the likelihood that more of the guns he has sold will end up being used in criminal activity rises, while a dealer who sells fewer guns will automatically have a lower number of gun purchases linked to gun-related crimes. Factor in the cases of guns that are bought by law-abiding citizens and are later stolen and used to commit crimes, as well as the crime rates that vary from one area to another, and you’ll see how much that number can change. So while nobody can claim that the Brady bill has the potential of preventing some gun crimes from being committed, it’s clear that it doesn’t work the same way all across the country and that, in many cases where extensive background checks are being performed by legitimate firearms retailers, high gun-related crime rates are still recorded, despite the firearm dealers operating in accordance with federal gun laws. It’s easy to go into panic mode when it comes to guns and it’s even easier to get distracted by things like Bernie Sanders’ voting record on gun control bills, but the truth is that even when gun control laws are passed and enforced, they might still not work and can end up restricting people’s freedom without actually making a significant contribution to the improvement of their safety.

Summary

Pistol caliber carbines have seen a bit of a resurgence over the last year with the introduction of the CZ Scorpion EVO, the Sig MPX, and new HK MP5 clones. As you might expect, there are companies looking for a way to tap into the pistol caliber carbine segment through some interesting avenues. American Manufacturing Group sent us their Lock, Stock, and Barrel conversion kit for the Glock 17 to try out.